#MegalodonLives?

cyrillictypewriter:

Discovery channel asks if C. megalodon could still be extant, Tardar megalodon answers.

Since #sharkweek has raised the question yet again, I’m reblogging this from last year.

#MegalodonLives?

cyrillictypewriter:

Discovery channel asks if C. megalodon could still be extant, Tardar megalodon answers.

Since #sharkweek has raised the question yet again, I’m reblogging this from last year.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

Nice!

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

Nice!

Better angles and hopefully better colors.

Found on the beach at the very end of the spit.

Still trying to ID it.

Porpoise atlas is our current best guess.

wilwheaton:

Here’s a list of the 149 for-profit companies whose cases are already pending, including several that object to all forms of contraception. Now that the Supreme Court has sanctioned their standing to make those claims and classified the coverage requirement as a substantial burden, they only have to show the sincerity of their beliefs to win.

Anyone who says this is not about disempowering women is lying to themselves and the rest of us.

Advocates of “religious freedom,” here is your legacy.

This isn’t freedom.

Spaceship!

Spaceship goes to the beach. (Made of Zoids and Blockman parts.)

halfassedtenacity:

Twogunhamen: Avatar of Sekhmet

My friend Dom makes the kind of things that aren’t ever getting old anytime soon.

halfassedtenacity:

Twogunhamen: Avatar of Sekhmet

My friend Dom makes the kind of things that aren’t ever getting old anytime soon.

Some flowers. And guests.

joerojasburke:

Is the coelacanth a ‘living fossil’? 
Definitely not if you think that means these fish have not evolved since the dinosaur days. 
These sketches show the huge variety of body shapes and sizes (in meters) that evolved among the coelacanths. Some had a short, round body, some had a long, slender body, some were eel-like, others resembled trout or even piranha, Casane and Laurenti point out. You can see how Latimeria, the lone surviving coelacanth lineage, attained double the body length of its closest relative, the extinct Macropoma, and also developed a very different body shape.
Source: Why coelacanths are not ‘living fossils’ A review of molecular and morphological data, by Didier Casane and Patrick Laurenti, Bioessays (2013)


Nicely explained.

joerojasburke:

Is the coelacanth a ‘living fossil’?

Definitely not if you think that means these fish have not evolved since the dinosaur days.

These sketches show the huge variety of body shapes and sizes (in meters) that evolved among the coelacanths. Some had a short, round body, some had a long, slender body, some were eel-like, others resembled trout or even piranha, Casane and Laurenti point out. You can see how Latimeria, the lone surviving coelacanth lineage, attained double the body length of its closest relative, the extinct Macropomaand also developed a very different body shape.

Nicely explained.

(via scientificillustration)

Movie sign? #mst3000

Movie sign? #mst3000

Horsetails, tall.

Horsetails, tall.

What.

What.

Sol through the smoke here in Homer. 

We need some rain.

Sol through the smoke here in Homer.

We need some rain.